Friday, March 01, 2013

Friday Florilegia, Friday, March 1, 2013


The Gospel for the Fourth Sunday of Lent
 
Gospel Lk 15:1-3, 11-32

Tax collectors and sinners were all drawing near to listen to Jesus,
but the Pharisees and scribes began to complain, saying,
“This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.”
So to them Jesus addressed this parable:
“A man had two sons, and the younger son said to his father,
‘Father give me the share of your estate that should come to me.’
So the father divided the property between them.
After a few days, the younger son collected all his belongings
and set off to a distant country
where he squandered his inheritance on a life of dissipation.
When he had freely spent everything,
a severe famine struck that country,
and he found himself in dire need.
So he hired himself out to one of the local citizens
who sent him to his farm to tend the swine.
And he longed to eat his fill of the pods on which the swine fed,
but nobody gave him any.
Coming to his senses he thought,
‘How many of my father’s hired workers
have more than enough food to eat,
but here am I, dying from hunger.
I shall get up and go to my father and I shall say to him,
“Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you.
I no longer deserve to be called your son;
treat me as you would treat one of your hired workers.”’
So he got up and went back to his father.
While he was still a long way off,
his father caught sight of him, and was filled with compassion.
He ran to his son, embraced him and kissed him.
His son said to him,
‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you;
I no longer deserve to be called your son.’
But his father ordered his servants,
‘Quickly bring the finest robe and put it on him;
put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet.
Take the fattened calf and slaughter it.
Then let us celebrate with a feast,
because this son of mine was dead, and has come to life again;
he was lost, and has been found.’
Then the celebration began.
Now the older son had been out in the field
and, on his way back, as he neared the house,
he heard the sound of music and dancing.
He called one of the servants and asked what this might mean.
The servant said to him,
‘Your brother has returned
and your father has slaughtered the fattened calf
because he has him back safe and sound.’
He became angry,
and when he refused to enter the house,
his father came out and pleaded with him.
He said to his father in reply,
‘Look, all these years I served you
and not once did I disobey your orders;
yet you never gave me even a young goat to feast on with my friends.
But when your son returns
who swallowed up your property with prostitutes,
for him you slaughter the fattened calf.’
He said to him,
‘My son, you are here with me always;
everything I have is yours.
But now we must celebrate and rejoice,
because your brother was dead and has come to life again;
he was lost and has been found.’”

 

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Nincompoopery



I haven't written much, if anything, about Pope Benedict's retirement. I think it's a decision only he can make; with my retirement happening on the day after his, I think I understand his motives. I know how hard it is to be an accountant at a small company at 66, I can't imagine what it would be like to be the Pope at 86. And, Benedict is looking increasingly frail and, sadly, seems to be aging very quickly. He may feel he could go on, but for reasons both personal and professional he may question whether he should go on. I understand him thinking he shouldn't.

Too, much of what has been written in the last two or three weeks strikes me as nothing more than idle speculation, sinking at times to the level of just plain gossip. There are people who presume to speak with great authority about what will happen when Benedict leaves, how do they know that, any more than the rest of us? It's nincompoopery! Who needs it?

I simply have the feeling that, at this time in particular, the Holy Spirit is actively guiding the Church and will guide the Conclave. I have an inkling that the next pope may not be any of the Cardinals whose names have been prominently mentioned by so-called experts as likely successors; I think the one chosen may be from way out in left field, and will be the best choice for just that reason. But, I don't care, and I'm willing to wait to see how matters play out and to rejoice when the next pontiff is finally named. There's nothing else to do.

Pray for Benedict XVI as he leaves office, pray for the work of the Conclave, and pray for the new pope, whoever that might be.

Sunday, February 24, 2013

The Early Church Fathers, Sunday, February 24, 2013, Hermas


Believe first of all that God is one, that he created all things and set them in order and brought out of nonexistence into existence everything that is, and that he contains all things while he himself is uncontained (The Shepherd, 2:1:1 [A.D. 80]).

Friday, February 22, 2013

Friday Florilegia, Friday, February 19, 2013

Third Sunday of Lent
Lectionary: 30


Reading 1 Ex 3:1-8a, 13-15

Moses was tending the flock of his father-in-law Jethro,
the priest of Midian.
Leading the flock across the desert, he came to Horeb,
the mountain of God.
There an angel of the LORD appeared to Moses in fire
flaming out of a bush.
As he looked on, he was surprised to see that the bush,
though on fire, was not consumed.
So Moses decided,
“I must go over to look at this remarkable sight,
and see why the bush is not burned.”

When the LORD saw him coming over to look at it more closely,
God called out to him from the bush, AMoses! Moses!”
He answered, “Here I am.”
God said, “Come no nearer!
Remove the sandals from your feet,
for the place where you stand is holy ground.
I am the God of your fathers, “ he continued,
“the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob.”
Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.
But the LORD said,
“I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt
and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers,
so I know well what they are suffering.
Therefore I have come down to rescue them
from the hands of the Egyptians
and lead them out of that land into a good and spacious land,
a land flowing with milk and honey.”

Moses said to God, “But when I go to the Israelites
and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’
if they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what am I to tell them?”
God replied, “I am who am.”
Then he added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites:
I AM sent me to you.”

God spoke further to Moses, “Thus shall you say to the Israelites:
The LORD, the God of your fathers,
the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob,
has sent me to you.

“This is my name forever;
thus am I to be remembered through all generations.”

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

A Word on Wednesday, Wednesday, February 20, 2013 St. Basil


“Not the power to remember, but its very opposite, the power to forget, is a necessary condition for our existence.” St Basil

Tuesday, February 03, 2009

Gull

 


Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
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